Author Topic: Major mechanic overhaul  (Read 4626 times)

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April 03, 2015, 01:06:49 PM
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khornel

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Up until now, my plans were to work on a Steam release patch, before I started work on alpha 2. However, a new mechanic has forced me to put the current progress in a separate alpha version altogether, so that new players won't need to get acquainted with how the game works now. What this means is really that patch fixes for alpha 1 will be somewhat delayed.

I would love your feedback on this before I start working on it, so please write anything that comes to mind.

Specializations
First of all, the education mechanic is getting removed completely and a new specialization system will be added.

All software features, which are not forced, will be categorized in to specializations, e.g. 3D for Operating Systems, Game Engines and Games will all be a part of a 3D specialization.

Each employee will have a skill level in each of these specialization categories, separated between design, code and art. The current skill system will stay, but it will be harder to level up and it will act as an upper skill limit for specializations and a measure of incompetence in other fields.

Specialization skills will increase as employees work on software that has features in each specialization, depending on their individual complexity. It can also increase by sending employees off to education, which will be much more effective. As with the current education system, specialization skills will decrease over time, as employees get behind current technological advances, if they aren't kept up to date.

Finally, specialization skills will control how much quality an employee can add to a product and how fast. An employee with zero networking skills won't be able to add quality to the MMO part of a game for example.

A benefit of this system is it's intuitiveness; it makes much more sense to say "I need someone who is specialized in network programming or 3D art" than "I need someone who has at least 50% design education"
« Last Edit: April 03, 2015, 01:10:09 PM by khornel »

April 03, 2015, 03:02:38 PM
Reply #1

nerdistmonk

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Up until now, my plans were to work on a Steam release patch, before I started work on alpha 2. However, a new mechanic has forced me to put the current progress in a separate alpha version altogether, so that new players won't need to get acquainted with how the game works now. What this means is really that patch fixes for alpha 1 will be somewhat delayed.

I would love your feedback on this before I start working on it, so please write anything that comes to mind.

Specializations
First of all, the education mechanic is getting removed completely and a new specialization system will be added.

All software features, which are not forced, will be categorized in to specializations, e.g. 3D for Operating Systems, Game Engines and Games will all be a part of a 3D specialization.


I would change the name from 3D to 3D APIs (small cosmetic change) same with all other specializations, It sounds more professional, i know minor quibble.

Each employee will have a skill level in each of these specialization categories, separated between design, code and art. The current skill system will stay, but it will be harder to level up and it will act as an upper skill limit for specializations and a measure of incompetence in other fields.

Slower to level up? it seems sorta grindy already to me? _shrugs_, idk, guess we shall see what happens then.

Specialization skills will increase as employees work on software that has features in each specialization, depending on their individual complexity. It can also increase by sending employees off to education, which will be much more effective. As with the current education system, specialization skills will decrease over time, as employees get behind current technological advances, if they aren't kept up to date.

I would almost say that perhaps it would be better if the game had a procedurally generated education content system? (yes i just made that crap up :D), what i mean is, the game could procedurally generate learning materials for use like: Fundamentals of Code '81, Fundamentals of Coding '82, Advanced Graphical Design '85, basically an employee who takes one of these generated courses will never forget the course until he/she dies, but at the same time that course will become near useless if you begin to make more technologically advanced designs, its another reason why i wished the computers/servers had interchangable OSes, it "dates" them, if you do not upgrade the OS then the computer (and your products) are forever stuck in 1985 so to speak, but if you got great prices and your software is really polished (25 year old software generally is) then it will still do well regardless of age.

(just look at the ancient crud businesses use on their machines, they are terrified of replacing something that "just works" so they keep it around for decades)

Basically your programmer's would be well trained 1985 era programmer's and unless you keep them current on materials they would only ever be able to make software from the year they were trained? Combine this with the skill system the game has and basically it means with practice a programmer can become very, very adept at making software of a specific area, and his skill levels lend him to quickly learn new materials. (the more time you let elapse between training, the longer it takes for him/her to catch up, and as i said it may be desirable to not bother learning anything new, stick with what works if it makes you money?)

(alot of thinking out loud there, use what looks useful to you, i just picked 1985 as an example, but it would be like that for any era obviously)

Finally, specialization skills will control how much quality an employee can add to a product and how fast. An employee with zero networking skills won't be able to add quality to the MMO part of a game for example.

A benefit of this system is it's intuitiveness; it makes much more sense to say "I need someone who is specialized in network programming or 3D art" than "I need someone who has at least 50% design education"

I agree with the above, you could have a system where there is a: Networking API Skill, 3D API Skills, 2D API Skills, Audio API Skills, etc
Then you have your existing generic skills: Coding, Design, Artist, etc

My idea would come in as a further set of conditions, basically a neat enhancement to your "education" system you are working on, the game can generated a smathering of materials yearly.

edit: another argument for implementing patches into the game: a means to polish up a "Bad" game into a "Good" Game, or a "mediocre" antivirus could be polished up into a "Great" Antivirus (depending on how much time you wish to sink into making said patch, a poorly made patch can actually cause the reverse to come true), Pair this up with more effective marketing: I.E if im marketing something, it should be selling still especially if its good quality and a good price. Patch a program, then start some marketing: Boom, new sales.
« Last Edit: April 04, 2015, 03:53:43 PM by nerdistmonk »